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Enhanced effects of combined cognitive bias modification and computerised cognitive behaviour therapy on social anxiety

Butler, E., Mobini, S., Rapee, R. M., Mackintosh, B., Reynolds, S. A. and Walla, P. (2015) Enhanced effects of combined cognitive bias modification and computerised cognitive behaviour therapy on social anxiety. Cogent Psychology, 2 (1). 1011905. ISSN 2331-1908

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1080/23311908.2015.1011905

Abstract/Summary

This study examines whether combined cognitive bias modification for interpretative biases (CBM-I) and computerised cognitive behaviour therapy (C-CBT) can produce enhanced positive effects on interpretation biases and social anxiety. Forty socially anxious students were randomly assigned into two conditions, an intervention group (positive CBM-I + C-CBT) or an active control (neutral CBM-I + C-CBT). At pre-test, participants completed measures of social anxiety, interpretative bias, cognitive distortions, and social and work adjustment. They were exposed to 6 × 30 min sessions of web-based interventions including three sessions of either positive or neutral CBM-I and three sessions of C-CBT, one session per day. At post-test and two-week follow-up, participants completed the baseline measures. A combined positive CBM-I + C-CBT produced less negative interpretations of ambiguous situations than neutral CBM-I + C-CBT. The results also showed that both positive CBM-I + C-CBT and neutral CBM-I + C-CBT reduced social anxiety and cognitive distortions as well as improving work and social adjustment. However, greater effect sizes were observed in the positive CBM-I + C-CBT condition than the control. This indicates that adding positive CBM-I to C-CBT enhanced the training effects on social anxiety, cognitive distortions, and social and work adjustment compared to the neutral CBM-I + C-CBT condition.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Charlie Waller Institute
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Department of Psychology
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Anxiety and Depression in Young People (AnDY)
ID Code:43660
Publisher:Taylor and Francis

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