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Clinical implications of cognitive bias modification for interpretative biases in social anxiety: an integrative literature review

Mobini, S., Reynolds, S. and Mackintosh, B. (2013) Clinical implications of cognitive bias modification for interpretative biases in social anxiety: an integrative literature review. Cognitive Therapy and Research, 37 (1). pp. 173-182. ISSN 0147-5916

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1007/s10608-012-9445-8

Abstract/Summary

Cognitive theories of social anxiety indicate that negative cognitive biases play a key role in causing and maintaining social anxiety. On the basis of these cognitive theories, laboratory-based research has shown that individuals with social anxiety exhibit negative interpretation biases of ambiguous social situations. Cognitive Bias Modification for interpretative biases (CBM-I) has emerged from this basic science research to modify negative interpretative biases in social anxiety and reduce emotional vulnerability and social anxiety symptoms. However, it is not yet clear if modifying interpretation biases via CBM will have any enduring effect on social anxiety symptoms or improve social functioning. The aim of this paper is to review the relevant literature on interpretation biases in social anxiety and discuss important implications of CBM-I method for clinical practice and research.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Charlie Waller Institute
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Department of Psychology
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Anxiety and Depression in Young People (AnDY)
ID Code:46297
Publisher:Springer

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