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Linking social interdependence preferences to achievement goal adoption

Elliot, A., J., Aldhobaiban, N., Kobeisy, A., Murayama, K., Gocłowska, M. A., Lichtenfeld, S. and Khayat, A. (2016) Linking social interdependence preferences to achievement goal adoption. Learning and Individual Differences, 50. pp. 291-295. ISSN 1041-6080

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1016/j.lindif.2016.08.020

Abstract/Summary

Social interdependence theory and the 2 x 2 achievement goal framework represent two important literatures that are often studied independently. The present research examined general social interdependence attitudes in school (cooperative, competitive, and individualistic) as antecedents of individuals’ situation-specific (semester- or class-focused) achievement goal adoption. All three studies consistently found that a cooperative attitude positively predicted mastery-approach goals, a competitive attitude positively predicted performance-approach and performance-avoidance goals, and an individualistic attitude positively predicted mastery-approach goals. The only anticipated relation that did not emerge consistently was that of an individualistic attitude as a positive predictor of mastery-avoidance goals. Implications of the present work for future empirical and theoretical development both in the social interdependence and the achievement goal literature are discussed.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Department of Psychology
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Development
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Social
ID Code:66801
Publisher:Elsevier

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