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The influence of phytochemical composition and resulting sensory attributes on preference for salad rocket (Eruca sativa) accessions by consumers of varying TAS2R38 diplotype

Bell, L., Methven, L. and Wagstaff, C. (2017) The influence of phytochemical composition and resulting sensory attributes on preference for salad rocket (Eruca sativa) accessions by consumers of varying TAS2R38 diplotype. Food Chemistry, 222. pp. 6-17. ISSN 0308-8146

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1016/j.foodchem.2016.11.153

Abstract/Summary

Seven accessions of Eruca sativa (“salad rocket”) were subjected to a randomised consumer assessment. Liking of appearance and taste attributes were analysed, as well as perceptions of bitterness, hotness, pepperiness and sweetness. Consumers were genotyped for TAS2R38 status to determine if liking is influenced by perception of bitter compounds such as glucosinolates (GSLs) and isothiocyanates (ITCs). Responses were combined with previously published data relating to phytochemical content and sensory data in Principal Component Analysis to determine compounds influencing liking/perceptions. Hotness, not bitterness, is the main attribute on which consumers base their liking of rocket. Some consumers rejected rocket based on GSL/ITC concentrations, whereas some preferred hotness. Bitter perception did not significantly influence liking of accessions, despite PAV/PAV ‘supertasters’ scoring higher for this attribute. High sugar-GSL/ITC ratios significantly reduce perceptions of hotness and bitterness for some consumers. Importantly the GSL glucoraphanin does not impart significant influence on liking or perception traits.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Centre for Food Security
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy > Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences > Human Nutrition Research Group
ID Code:68464
Uncontrolled Keywords:Glucosinolates; Isothiocyanates; Brassicaceae; Health-beneficial compounds; Leafy vegetables; Bitter taste perception; Pungency; Taste
Publisher:Elsevier

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