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Plant yourself where language blooms: direct experience of nature changes how parents and children talk about nature

Cameron Faulkner, T., Macdonald, R., Serratrice, L., Melville, J. and Gattis, M. (2017) Plant yourself where language blooms: direct experience of nature changes how parents and children talk about nature. Children, Youth and Environments, 27 (2). pp. 110-124. ISSN 1546-2250

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To link to this item DOI: 10.7721/chilyoutenvi.27.2.0110

Abstract/Summary

The study investigated the affordances of direct and indirect experience of nature on parent-child talk. Parents and children produced a wider range of nature words when exploring a park (direct experience) than when exploring a thematically-matched indoor visitor center (indirect experience). Parents and children also produced more plant-related nature word types when exploring the park compared to the visitor center. Direct experience of nature provides an optimal context for children to learn the language of nature and consequently to cultivate children's status as custodians of the natural world.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Language and Cognition
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Department of Clinical Language Sciences
Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Centre for Literacy and Multilingualism (CeLM)
ID Code:73178
Publisher:University of Cincinnati

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