Accessibility navigation


Orange processing waste valorisation for the production of bio-based pigments using the fungal strains Monascus purpureus and Penicillium purpurogenum

Kantifedaki, A., Kachrimanidou, V., Mallouchos, A., Papanikolaou, S. and Koutinas, A. A. (2018) Orange processing waste valorisation for the production of bio-based pigments using the fungal strains Monascus purpureus and Penicillium purpurogenum. Journal of Cleaner Production, 185. pp. 882-890. ISSN 0959-6526

[img]
Preview
Text - Accepted Version
· Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives.
· Please see our End User Agreement before downloading.

743kB

It is advisable to refer to the publisher's version if you intend to cite from this work. See Guidance on citing.

To link to this item DOI: 10.1016/j.jclepro.2018.03.032

Abstract/Summary

Orange processing wastes have been evaluated for the production of pigments by the fungal strains Monascus purpureus ATCC 16365 and Penicillium purpurogenum CBS 113139. Solid state fermentations were initially conducted on waste orange peels with the fungal strain M. purpureus aiming to assess various pigment extraction methods, the effect of particle size as well as the effect of nitrogen addition and incubation time. Under the optimum conditions, solid state fermentations were also performed with the strain P. purpuronegum to evaluate pigment production on waste orange peels. M. purpureus was more efficient than P. purpurogenum for the production of pigments during solid state fermentation, yielding 9 absorbance units (AU) per g of dry fermented substrate. Semi-solid state fermentations were subsequently conducted by suspending waste orange peels in liquid media leading to pigment production of up to 0.95 AU mL−1. Submerged fermentations were carried out with both fungal strains using aqueous extracts from either boiled or hydrodistilled orange peel residues as the sole fermentation medium showing that up to 0.58 AU mL−1 of pigment production could be achieved. Each fermentation feedstock and fermentation mode influenced significantly the production of pigments by each fungal strain used.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy > Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences > Food Research Group
ID Code:76826
Publisher:Elsevier

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

University Staff: Request a correction | Centaur Editors: Update this record

Page navigation