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Postgraduate symposium the role of fat in gastric emptying and satiety: acute and chronic effects: conference on ‘Multidisciplinary approaches to nutritional problems’

Clegg, M. and Shafat, A. (2009) Postgraduate symposium the role of fat in gastric emptying and satiety: acute and chronic effects: conference on ‘Multidisciplinary approaches to nutritional problems’. Proceedings of the Nutrition Society, 68 (1). pp. 89-97. ISSN 0029-6651

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1017/S0029665108008859

Abstract/Summary

Dietary fat is an important factor in the aetiology of obesity and the metabolic syndrome. It has been widely debated whether gastric emptying (GE) is altered in obesity. GE times have been reported as both longer and shorter in obese individuals compared with matched lean individuals. However, the general consensus is that GE is accelerated and satiety is lower in obesity. Research has implicated a high-fat (HF) diet in these findings. A single HF meal has a longer GE time than a low-fat meal and can even delay GE of the subsequent meal. However, an HF diet has shown different effects. Feeding a HF diet adapts gastrointestinal function to reduce GE times in comparison with a low-fat diet. Increased GE may lead to decreased satiety and faster onset of subsequent eating episodes. Further results have suggested that consuming an HF diet for 14 d increases the GE rate of HF food but not low-fat food. Consuming HF diets for 2 weeks has also been shown to increase food intake. Decreased satiation following an HF diet may cause increased food intake and a positive energy balance, potentially resulting in a gradual increase in adiposity. Recent results have suggested that gastrointestinal transit is accelerated following only 3 d on a HF diet. The variable GE times reported in obesity may be associated with interactions between the HF diet and obesity and not simply the obese state.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy > Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences > Human Nutrition Research Group
ID Code:80414
Publisher:Cambridge University Press

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