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Memories of the self in adolescence: examining 6,558 self-image norms

Hards, E., Ellis, J., Fisk, J. and Reynolds, S. (2019) Memories of the self in adolescence: examining 6,558 self-image norms. Memory, 27 (7). pp. 1011-1017. ISSN 0965-8211

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1080/09658211.2019.1608256

Abstract/Summary

Adolescence is a critical developmental period. It involves the construction and consolidation of ‘the self’ and the laying down of autobiographical memories that endure throughout life. There is limited data that examines how young people spontaneously describe their ‘self’. The aim of the current study is to provide normative data of adolescent generated self-images and present this in a freely accessible database. A secondary aim is to compare adult and adolescent self-images. Young people (n = 822) aged 13-18 years completed the Twenty Statements Test a task that requires participants to generate their own self-images. Data were coded into ‘Self-image norms’ according to the method devised by Rathbone and Moulin (2017). Descriptive data showed that positive ‘Traits’ were most often used by adolescents to describe ‘the self’. There were few gender differences, but boys generated fewer self-images than girls. Adolescents were more likely to use ‘Traits’ to describe their ‘self’ and adults were more likely to use ‘Social roles.’ These data are the first set of self-images generated by adolescents, collated in a freely accessible database. They can be used to understand how ‘the self’ is described by adolescents and will be useful for cueing autobiographical memories in young people.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Anxiety and Depression in Young People (AnDY)
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Department of Psychology
ID Code:83199
Publisher:Taylor & Francis

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