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Prebiotic supplementation of In Vitro fecal fermentations inhibits proteolysis by gut bacteria, and host diet shapes gut bacterial metabolism and response to intervention

Wang, X., Gibson, G. R., Costabile, A., Sailer, M., Theis, S. and Rastall, R. A. (2019) Prebiotic supplementation of In Vitro fecal fermentations inhibits proteolysis by gut bacteria, and host diet shapes gut bacterial metabolism and response to intervention. Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 85 (9). e02749-18. ISSN 1098-5336

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1128/AEM.02749-18

Abstract/Summary

Metabolism of protein by gut bacteria is potentially detrimental due to the production of toxic metabolites, such as ammonia, amines, p-cresol, and indole. The consumption of prebiotic carbohydrates results in specific changes in the composition and/or activity of the microbiota that may confer benefits to host well-being and health. Here, we have studied the impact of prebiotics on proteolysis within the gut in vitro. Anaerobic stirred batch cultures were inoculated with feces from omnivores (n = 3) and vegetarians (n = 3) and four protein sources (casein, meat, mycoprotein, and soy protein) with and without supplementation by an oligofructose-enriched inulin. Bacterial counts and concentrations of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), ammonia, phenol, indole, and p-cresol were monitored during fermentation. Addition of the fructan prebiotic Synergy1 increased levels of bifidobacteria (P = 0.000019 and 0.000013 for omnivores and vegetarians, respectively). Branched-chain fatty acids (BCFA) were significantly lower in fermenters with vegetarians’ feces (P = 0.004), reduced further by prebiotic treatment. Ammonia production was lower with Synergy1. Bacterial adaptation to different dietary protein sources was observed through different patterns of ammonia production between vegetarians and omnivores. In volunteer samples with high baseline levels of phenol, indole, p-cresol, and skatole, Synergy1 fermentation led to a reduction of these compounds.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy > Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences
ID Code:84628
Publisher:American Society of Microbology

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