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The influence of social relationships on men's weight

Harcourt, K. A., Appleton, J., Clegg, M. E. and Hunter, L. (2020) The influence of social relationships on men's weight. Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, 52 (2). pp. 106-113. ISSN 1499-4046

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1016/j.jneb.2019.08.009

Abstract/Summary

To explore how men's social relationships influence their dietary, physical activity, and weight loss intentions and behaviors. Qualitative study using semistructured interviews. One county in the southwest of England. Men (n = 19) aged 18-60 years with a body mass index ≥24 kg/m who were otherwise healthy. Men's perceptions of dieting, physical activity and weight loss, and how social relationships influence these behaviors. Interviews were audiorecorded and transcribed verbatim. Transcripts were coded line by line using NVivo software. Themes and subthemes were inductively generated using thematic analysis. Four themes were derived: (1) how experiences shape beliefs, (2) being a proper bloke, (3) adapting to family life, and (4) support from outside the home. Men discussed how partners were a greater influence on diet than physical activity. Attitudes toward diet and physical activity were influenced by life events such as becoming a father. It was framed as acceptable for men to talk to their friends about exercise and food intake in general, but they emphasized that this was not for "support." Family members were key influences on men's behaviors. Future qualitative research could include interviews with men's families. Findings may inform family weight loss interventions.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy > Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences > Human Nutrition Research Group
ID Code:86694
Publisher:Elsevier

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