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Growth temperature influences postharvest glucosinolate concentrations and hydrolysis product formation in first and second cuts of rocket salad

Jasper, J., Wagstaff, C. and Bell, L. (2020) Growth temperature influences postharvest glucosinolate concentrations and hydrolysis product formation in first and second cuts of rocket salad. Postharvest Biology and Technology, 163. p. 111157. ISSN 0925-5214

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1016/j.postharvbio.2020.111157

Abstract/Summary

Rocket salad species (Diplotaxis tenuifolia and Eruca sativa; also known as E. vesicaria) are known for their high concentrations of health-related isothiocyanates, which are derived from secondary metabolites called glucosinolates. Increases in temperature due to climate change and extreme weather event frequencies over the coming decades are likely to influence not only the growth of leafy vegetables, but also their nutritional density. It is therefore essential to determine the impacts of these in order to mitigate crop losses and nutritional decline in future. Our data show there is a strong influence of pre-harvest growth temperatures on glucosinolate biosynthesis and formation of glucosinolate hydrolysis products postharvest, and that this is genotype dependent. High growth temperature (40 °C) severely retarded germination, growth, regrowth, and survival of rocket plants. Highest glucosinolate concentrations were observed in first and second cuts at 40 °C, but did not correspond to highest isothiocyanate concentrations (observed at 30 °C, second cut). Hydrolysis product formation is proportionately not as great as glucosinolate increases at 40 °C, possibly due to inhibition of enzyme function(s) at higher temperatures. These data indicate that high growth temperatures increase glucosinolate accumulation, but growth and productivity is significantly reduced. Much greater emphasis is needed for breeding cultivars tolerant to high growth temperatures in order to maximise nutritional benefits imparted by temperature stress.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Agriculture, Policy and Development > Biodiversity, Crops and Agroecosystems Division > Crops Research Group
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy > Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences > Human Nutrition Research Group
ID Code:89152
Uncontrolled Keywords:Arugula, Diplotaxis tenuifolia, Eruca sativa, Liquid chromatography mass spectrometry, Abiotic stress, Isothiocyanates
Publisher:Elsevier

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