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Reformulation of foods for weight loss: a focus on carbohydrates and fats

Thondre, P. S. and Clegg, M. E. (2019) Reformulation of foods for weight loss: a focus on carbohydrates and fats. In: Raikos, V. and Ranawana, V. (eds.) Reformulation as a Strategy for Developing Healthier Food Products. Springer, pp. 7-64. ISBN 9783030236205

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1007/978-3-030-23621-2_2

Abstract/Summary

The Health Survey for England 2016 shows that the prevalence of overweight and obesity is increasing with 27% of adults being obese and 40% of men and 30% of women were overweight. As half of the UK population is expected to be obese by 2050, reformulation of food products can play a significant role in production of healthier foods with low energy density that can increase satiety and reduce food intake. Fat is the most energy-dense nutrient; hence it is a key area of reformulation for weight loss. The focus for reformulation in terms of fat is often on reducing saturated fat, but for weight loss overall fat reduction is the most important. This can be achieved through fat replacement products or altering the type of fats added to products to make them more satiating. Food reformulation in carbohydrate foods mainly involves reducing sugar and increasing fibre content. Considering that the current UK population has a high intake of sugars and low intake of fibre, reformulation strategies using bulk and intense sweeteners (ISs) as well as various dietary fibre ingredients are a viable way to have a positive influence on public health. The current chapter focuses on how carbohydrate and fat in food products can be reformulated to promote satiety and weight loss.

Item Type:Book or Report Section
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy > Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences > Human Nutrition Research Group
ID Code:91728
Publisher:Springer

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