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Label-free smartphone quantitation of bacteria by darkfield imaging of light scattering in fluoropolymer micro capillary film allows portable detection of bacteriophage lysis

Dönmez, S. İ., Needs, S. H. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-3407-9637, Osborn, H. M. I. and Edwards, A. D. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2369-989X (2020) Label-free smartphone quantitation of bacteria by darkfield imaging of light scattering in fluoropolymer micro capillary film allows portable detection of bacteriophage lysis. Sensors and Actuators B: Chemical, 323. p. 128645. ISSN 0925-4005

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1016/j.snb.2020.128645

Abstract/Summary

Conventional methods for the detection and quantitation of bacteria are slow, laborious and require a laboratory. Microfluidic systems offer faster and portable testing, and smartphone cameras can record colorimetric or fluorometric bioassays, but this requires dye addition. Here, we demonstrate for the first time label-free smartphone detection of bacterial light scattering by darkfield microfluidic imaging to measure bacteria and bacteriophage lysis. A single LED and portable 3D printed imaging box allowed bacterial concentration and growth to be measured by direct imaging of bacterial light scattering. Bacteriophage lysis was detected within a 10-channel microfluidic device made from melt-extruded fluoropolymer micro capillary film, allowing rapid detection of host specificity. Elimination of unwanted reflections and optimising illumination angle are critical for successful darkfield bacterial imaging, with 15° giving maximal intensity. Bacterial sedimentation was directly observed within microfluidic devices, and detection sensitivity significantly increased by allowing bacteria to sediment for 30 min. With this simple, low-cost, 3D printed system bacterial concentrations down to an optical density of 0.1 could be measured corresponding to 8 × 104 colony forming units (CFU) per microdevice, approaching the sensitivity of conventional spectrophotometers. Bacteriophage lysis could be detected at a range of starting cell concentrations. With a low starting cell concentration, the increase in light scatter signal with incubation was prevented in the presence of bacteriophage. Conversely, with high starting cell concentration, the light scatter signal detected at the start was clearly eliminated when phage were added, indicating this simple system allows direct visualisation of bacteriophage eliminating light scattering by lysis.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy > School of Pharmacy > Pharmaceutics Research Group
ID Code:92286
Publisher:Elsevier

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