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Beyond Alzheimer’s disease: can bilingualism be a more generalized protective factor in neurodegeneration?

Voits, T., Pliatsikas, C. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7093-1773, Robson, H. and Rothman, J. (2020) Beyond Alzheimer’s disease: can bilingualism be a more generalized protective factor in neurodegeneration? Neuropsychologia, 147. 107593. ISSN 0028-3932

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2020.107593

Abstract/Summary

Bilingualism has been argued to have an impact on cognition and brain structure. Effects have been reported across the lifespan: from healthy children to ageing adults, including clinical (ageing) populations. It has been argued that active bilingualism may significantly contribute to the delaying of the expression of Alzheimer’s disease symptoms. If bilingualism plays an ameliorative role against the expression of neurodegeneration in dementia, it is possible that it could have similar effects for other neurodegenerative disorders, including Multiple Sclerosis, Parkinson’s and Huntington’s Diseases. To date, however, direct relevant evidence remains limited, not least because the necessary scientific motivations for investigating this with greater depth have not yet been fully articulated. Herein, we provide a roadmap that reviews the relevant literatures, highlighting potential links across neurodegenerative disorders and bilingualism more generally.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Centre for Literacy and Multilingualism (CeLM)
Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Centre for Integrative Neuroscience and Neurodynamics (CINN)
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Department of Clinical Language Sciences
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Language and Cognition
ID Code:92579
Uncontrolled Keywords:Bilingualism; dementia; cognitive reserve; Huntington’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Multiple sclerosis.
Publisher:Elsevier

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