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The impact of low-level iron supplements on the faecal microbiota of irritable bowel syndrome and healthy donors using in vitro batch cultures

Poveda, C., Pereira, D. I. A., Lewis, M. and Walton, G. (2020) The impact of low-level iron supplements on the faecal microbiota of irritable bowel syndrome and healthy donors using in vitro batch cultures. Nutrients, 12 (12). 3819. ISSN 2072-6643

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To link to this item DOI: 10.3390/nu12123819

Abstract/Summary

Ferrous iron supplementation has been reported to adversely alter the gut microbiota in infants. To date, the impact of iron on the adult microbiota is limited, particularly at low supplementary concentrations. The aim of this research was to explore the impact of low-level iron supplementation on the gut microbiota of healthy and Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) volunteers. Anaerobic, pH-controlled in vitro batch cultures were inoculated with faeces from healthy or IBS donors along with iron (ferrous sulphate, nanoparticulate iron and pea ferritin (50 μmol−1 iron)). The microbiota were explored by fluorescence in situ hybridisation coupled with flow cytometry. Furthermore, metabolite production was assessed by gas chromatography. IBS volunteers had different starting microbial profiles to healthy controls. The sources of iron did not negatively impact the microbial population, with results of pea ferritin supplementation being similar to nanoparticulate iron, whilst ferrous sulphate led to enhanced Bacteroides spp. The metabolite data suggested no shift to potentially negative proteolysis. The results indicate that low doses of iron from the three sources were not detrimental to the gut microbiota. This is the first time that pea ferritin fermentation has been tested and indicates that low dose supplementation of iron is unlikely to be detrimental to the gut microbiota.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy > Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences > Food Microbial Sciences Research Group
ID Code:94934
Publisher:MDPI

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