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Development of visual acuity in children: assessing the contributions of cognition and age in LEA Chart Acuity Readings

Myklebust, A. K. and Riddell, P. M. (2021) Development of visual acuity in children: assessing the contributions of cognition and age in LEA Chart Acuity Readings. Optometry and Vision Science, 99 (1). pp. 24-30. ISSN 1538-9235

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1097/OPX.0000000000001822

Abstract/Summary

Significance The development of visual acuity has often been looked upon as a function of age. This study considers whether cognition might also be a predictor of acuity in children. The results indicate that cognition is a predictor of acuity and therefore should play a role in vision evaluations and developmental research. Purpose Prior studies have shown that changes in visual acuity in typically developing children occur beyond primary school age. However, these studies almost exclusively use chronological age as the sole predictor for visual development. Since many of the tasks used to measure acuity have a cognitive demand, it is possible that age is not the best predictor for changes in this function. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of cognition on the development of visual acuity, and to compare this predictor with age. Methods The predictive ability of chronological age and cognition on acuity were assessed in a group of 81 typical children between five and eleven years old. Results Analysis of resulting trajectories show that while age indeed was a good predictor, development of visual acuity was equally well predicted by cognition. Moreover, partial correlations showed a strong correlation between cognition and acuity when controlling for age but no significant correlation between age and acuity when controlling for cognition. Conclusions These results suggest that age alone is not the optimal determinant for the development of visual acuity in typical school age children, as cognition was also found to be an important predictor.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Department of Psychology
Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Development
Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Perception and Action
ID Code:101869
Publisher:LWW Journals

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