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Soluble fibres as sucrose replacers: effects on physical and sensory properties of sugar-reduced short-dough biscuits

Rodriguez Garcia, J. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4986-3144, Ding, R., Nguyen, T. H. T., Grasso, S., Chatzifragkou, A. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-9255-7871 and Methven, L. (2022) Soluble fibres as sucrose replacers: effects on physical and sensory properties of sugar-reduced short-dough biscuits. LWT - Food Science and Technology. 113837. ISSN 0023-6438

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1016/j.lwt.2022.113837

Abstract/Summary

Four different soluble fibres were evaluated as sugar replacers in short dough biscuits: two resistant dextrins (Nutriose® FM06 and Promitor® SGF 70R) and two inulin-derived fibres (Orafti® HSI and Fibruline™ Instant). The degree of polymerisation of the fibres was analysed, and dough viscoelastic properties were assessed. Weight loss during baking, dimensions, textural properties, surface colour and sensory profile were evaluated. Higher degree of polymerisation fibres (e.g. Fibruline) limited water availability for syrup formation, restricting dough expansion and resulting in smaller, more compact, and harder biscuits than control. Biscuits with inulin derived fibres with a lower degree of polymerisation (e.g. Orafti) showed similar dimensions to control biscuits. In general, sucrose reduction gave place to biscuits with lower resistance to penetration and fracture strength due to less sugar recrystallisation in the final biscuit. In contrast, when dextrin-type fibres were used the rheological behaviour of the dough, spreading during baking, and resistance to penetration were similar to the control as the fibres showed an anti-plasticising effect similar to sucrose. However, all reduced sugar biscuits were significantly firmer and crunchier in sensory profile suggesting further optimisation is needed, potentially by modification of the fibre structure or baking method.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Life Sciences > School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy > Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences > Food Research Group
ID Code:106563
Uncontrolled Keywords:sugar replacement, short-dough biscuit, dextrin, inulin, texture.
Publisher:Elsevier

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