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The UK government’s 2022 food strategy a year later

Doherty, B., Jackson, P., Wagstaff, C. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9400-8641, White, M. and Duncombe, T. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4746-4470 (2023) The UK government’s 2022 food strategy a year later. Nature Food, 4 (10). pp. 824-825. ISSN 2662-1355

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1038/s43016-023-00859-x

Abstract/Summary

The lack of ambition of the UK Government’s 2022 Food Strategy (GFS) was evident from the start (2022). One year on from the GFS2 publication, the UK food system looks increasingly vulnerable with food prices increasing at record rates, food insecurity soaring; and empty shelves in UK supermarkets due to disruptions in fresh produce supply. The UK is increasingly reliant on imported fresh produce with 54% of our vegetables and 84% of our fresh fruit imported. Furthermore, the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affair’s (Defra) advisor Henry Dimbleby has resigned and published his own analysis of the problems with the food system5. The need for transformative change has never been more evident. However, the Government has abandoned and delayed several of its promises.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Interdisciplinary Research Centres (IDRCs) > Institute for Food, Nutrition and Health (IFNH)
Life Sciences > School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy > Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences > Human Nutrition Research Group
ID Code:113298
Publisher:Nature

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