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Does genotype and equol-production status affect response to isoflavones? Data from a pan-European study on the effects of isoflavones on cardiovascular risk markers in post-menopausal women

Vafeiadou, K., Hall, W.L. and Williams, C.M. (2006) Does genotype and equol-production status affect response to isoflavones? Data from a pan-European study on the effects of isoflavones on cardiovascular risk markers in post-menopausal women. Proceedings of the Nutrition Society, 65 (1). pp. 106-115. ISSN 0029-6651

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To link to this article DOI: 10.1079/PNS2005483

Abstract/Summary

The increase in CVD incidence following the menopause is associated with oestrogen loss. Dietary isoflavones are thought to be cardioprotective via their oestrogenic and oestrogen receptor-independent effects, but evidence to support this role is scarce. Individual variation in response to diet may be considerable and can obscure potential beneficial effects in a sample population; in particular, the response to isoflavone treatment may vary according to genotype and equol-production status. The effects of isoflavone supplementation (50hairspmg/d) on a range of established and novel biomarkers of CVD, including markers of lipid and glucose metabolism and inflammatory biomarkers, have been investigated in a placebo-controlled 2x8-week randomised cross-over study in 117 healthy post-menopausal women. Responsiveness to isoflavone supplementation according to (1) single nucleotide polymorphisms in a range of key CVD genes, including oestrogen receptor (ER) alpha and beta and (2) equol-production status has been examined. Isoflavones supplementation was found to have no effect on markers of lipids and glucose metabolism. Isoflavones improve C-reactive protein concentrations but do not affect other plasma inflammatory markers. There are no differences in response to isoflavones according to equol-production status. However, differences in HDL-cholesterol and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 response to isoflavones v. placebo are evident with specific ER beta genotypes. In conclusion, isoflavones have beneficial effects on C-reactive protein, but not other cardiovascular risk markers. However, specific ER beta gene polymorphic subgroups may benefit from isoflavone supplementation.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy > Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences
Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Institute for Cardiovascular and Metabolic Research (ICMR)
ID Code:12913
Uncontrolled Keywords:isoflavones, CVD, post-menopausal women, oestrogen receptor beta, single nucleotide polymorphisms, nutrient-gene interaction , HORMONE-REPLACEMENT THERAPY, ESTROGEN-RECEPTOR-BETA, C-REACTIVE PROTEIN, INFLAMMATION-SENSITIVE PROTEINS, SYSTEMIC ARTERIAL COMPLIANCE, RED-CLOVER, ENDOTHELIAL FUNCTION, SOY ISOFLAVONES, MENOPAUSAL WOMEN, PLASMA-LIPIDS
Additional Information:Summer Meeting of the Nutrition-Society University of East Anglia, Norwich, England 28 Jun-1 July 2005

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