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A double-blind, placebo controlled human study investigating the effects of coffee derived manno-oligosaccharides on the faecal microbiota of a healthy adult population.

Walton, G. E., Rastall, R. A., Martini, M., Williams, C., Jeffries, R. and Gibson, G. R. (2010) A double-blind, placebo controlled human study investigating the effects of coffee derived manno-oligosaccharides on the faecal microbiota of a healthy adult population. International Journal of Probiotics and Prebiotics, 5 (2). pp. 75-84. ISSN 1555-1431

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Official URL: http://www.newcenturyhealthpublishers.com/probioti...

Abstract/Summary

The aims of this study were to assess the impact of coffee derived mannooligosaccharides on the faecal microbiota of a healthy UK based population. Methods and Results: A double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover human intervention study was conducted. Volunteers were assigned, 3g MOS, 5g MOS and placebo coffee preparations, to consume daily over a 3 wks, followed by a 2 wk washout period. Faecal samples were collected, and microbial population characterised using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Short-chain and branched-chain fatty acid profiles were obtained by gas chromatography. All treatments led to significant lactobacilli increases (placebo, p < 0.001; 3g, p = 0.04; 5g, p=0.04). The 3g treatment led to a significant bifidobacteria increase (p=0.001). Significantly less iso-valerate was found in faeces following 3g MOS daily (p=0.05). Conclusions: The 3g dose of MOS led to a potentially beneficial shift in the faecal microbiota. MOS was therefore confirmed to be a prebiotic at 3g dose. Significance and Impact of Study: This study provides confirmation of a new novel prebiotic, that can be considered for incorporation into a wider variety of food products, to provide different selective and nutritional properties.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy > Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences > Food Microbial Sciences Research Group
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy > Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences > Food and Bioprocessing Research Group
ID Code:16539
Publisher:New century health publishers

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