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In vitro effects of synbiotic fermentation on the canine faecal microbiota.

Ogué-Bon, E., Khoo, C., McCartney, A. L., Gibson, G. R. and Rastall, R. A. (2010) In vitro effects of synbiotic fermentation on the canine faecal microbiota. FEMS microbiology ecology, 73 (3). pp. 587-600. ISSN 1574-6941

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To link to this article DOI: 10.1111/j.1574-6941.2010.00915.x

Abstract/Summary

Stirred, pH-controlled anaerobic batch cultures were used to investigate the in vitro effects of galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS) alone or combined with the probiotic Bifidobacterium bifidum 02 450B on the canine faecal microbiota of three different donors. GOS supported the growth of B. bifidum 02 450B throughout the fermentation. Quantitative analysis of bacterial populations by FISH revealed significant increases in Bifidobacterium spp. counts (Bif164) and a concomitant decrease in Clostridium histolyticum counts (Chis150) in the synbiotic-containing vessels compared with the controls and GOS vessels. Vessels containing probiotic alone displayed a transient increase in Bifidobacterium spp. and a transient decrease in Bacteroides spp. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis showed that GOS elicited similar alterations in the microbial profiles of the three in vitro runs. However, the synbiotic did not alter the microbial diversity of the three runs to the same extent as GOS alone. Nested PCR using universal primers, followed by bifidobacterial-specific primers illustrated low bifidobacterial diversity in dogs, which did not change drastically during the in vitro fermentation. This study illustrates that the canine faecal microbiota can be modulated in vitro by GOS supplementation and that GOS can sustain the growth of B. bifidum 02 450B in a synbiotic combination.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy > Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences > Food Microbial Sciences Research Group
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy > Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences > Food and Bioprocessing Research Group
ID Code:17344
Publisher:Wiley

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