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The effect of triacylglycerol fatty acid positional distribution on postprandial plasma metabolite and hormone responses in normal adult men

Zampelas, A., Williams, C. M., Morgan, L. M., Wright, J. and Quinlan, P. T. (1994) The effect of triacylglycerol fatty acid positional distribution on postprandial plasma metabolite and hormone responses in normal adult men. British Journal of Nutrition, 71 (3). pp. 401-410. ISSN 0007-1145

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To link to this article DOI: 10.1079/BJN19940147

Abstract/Summary

The present study has examined the possibility that the positional distribution of fatty acids on dietary triacyglycerol (TAG) influences the postprandial response to a liquid meal in adult subjects. Postprandial TAG, non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA), ketones, glucose, insulin and gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) responses were monitored in sixteen normal adult male subjects over 6 h following consumption of test meals containing dietary TAG in which palmitic acid was predominantly on the sn-1 (Control) or sn-2 positions (Betapol). Plasma total TAG, chylomicron-rich TAG and chylomicron-poor TAG concentrations were identical in response to the two test meals. The peak increase (mean (SD)) in chylomicron TAG was 0.85 (0.46) mmol/l after the Control meal and 0.85 (0.42) mmol/l after the Betapol meal. Plasma glucose, insulin, GIP, NEFA and ketone concentrations were also very similar following the two meals. It is concluded that dietary TAG containing saturated fatty acids on the sn-2 position appear in plasma at a similar level and over a similar timescale to TAG in which saturated fatty acids are predominantly located on sn-1 or sn-3 positions. The results reported in the present study demonstrate that the positional distribution of fatty acids on dietary TAG is not an important determinant of postprandial lipaemia in adult male subjects, but do not exclude the possibility that different responses may occur when these dietary TAG are given long term.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy > Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences > Human Nutrition Research Group
Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Institute for Cardiovascular and Metabolic Research (ICMR)
ID Code:18966
Publisher:Cambridge University Press

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