Accessibility navigation


Separation of astaxanthin from cells of Phaffia rhodozyma using colloidal gas aphrons (CGA) in a flotation column

Dermiki, M., Bourquin, A.-L. and Jauregi, P. (2010) Separation of astaxanthin from cells of Phaffia rhodozyma using colloidal gas aphrons (CGA) in a flotation column. Biotechnology Progress, 26 (2). pp. 477-487. ISSN 8756-7938

Full text not archived in this repository.

To link to this article DOI: 10.1002/btpr.340

Abstract/Summary

The aim of this study is to investigate the separation of astaxanthin from the cells of Phaffia rhodozyma using colloidal gas aphrons (CGA), which are surfactant stabilized microbubbles, in a flotation column. It was reported in previous studies that optimum recoveries are achieved at conditions that favor electrostatic interactions. Therefore, in this study, CGA generated from the cationic surfactant hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) were applied to suspensions of cells pretreated with NaOH. The different operation modes (batch or continuous) and the effect of volumetric ratio of CGA to feed, initial concentration of feed, operating height, and flow rate of CGA on the separation of astaxanthin were investigated. The volumetric ratio was found to have a significant effect on the separation of astaxanthin for both batch and continuous experiments. Additionally, the effect of homogenization of the cells on the purity of the recovered fractions was investigated, showing that the homogenization resulted in increased purity. Moreover, different concentrations of surfactant were used for the generation of CGA for the recovery of astaxanthin on batch mode; it was found that recoveries up to 98% could be achieved using CGA generated from a CTAB solution 0.8 mM, which is below the CTAB critical micellar concentration (CMC). These results offer important information for the scale-up of the separation of astaxanthin from the cells of P. rhodozyma using CGA.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy > Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences > Food and Bioprocessing Research Group
ID Code:26087
Publisher:Wiley

Centaur Editors: Update this record

Page navigation