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Using symptom and interference questionnaires to identify recovery among children with anxiety disorders

Evans, R., Thirlwall, K., Cooper, P. and Creswell, C. (2017) Using symptom and interference questionnaires to identify recovery among children with anxiety disorders. Psychological Assessment: A Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 29 (7). pp. 835-843. ISSN 1040-3590

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1037/pas0000375

Abstract/Summary

Objective: To determine if two widely used child and parent report questionnaires of child anxiety symptoms and interference (Spence Child Anxiety Scale, SCAS-C/P; Child Anxiety Impact Scale; CAIS-C/P) accurately identify recovery from common child anxiety disorder diagnoses. Method: 337 children (7-12 years, 51% female) and their parents completed diagnostic interviews (ADIS-IV-C/P) and questionnaire measures (SCAS-C/P and CAIS-C/P), before (Time 1) and after (Time 2) treatment or wait-list. Results: Time 2 parent reported interference (CAIS-P) was a good predictor of absence of any diagnoses (AUC=.81). In terms of specific diagnoses, Time 2 SCAS-C/P separation anxiety subscale (SCAS-C/P-SA) identified recovery from separation anxiety disorder well (SCAS-C-SA, AUC=.80; SCAS-P-SA, AUC=.82) as did the CAIS-P (AUC=.79). The CAIS-P also successfully identified recovery from social phobia (AUC=.78) and generalized anxiety disorder (AUC=.76). These AUC values were supported by moderate to good sensitivity (.70-.78) and specificity (.70-.73) at the best identified cut-off scores. None of the measures successfully identified recovery from specific phobia. Conclusions: Questionnaire measures, particularly the CAIS-P, can be used to identify whether children have recovered from common anxiety disorders, with the exception of specific phobias. Cut-off scores have been identified that can guide the use of routine outcome measures in clinical practice.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Department of Psychology
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Development
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Psychopathology and Affective Neuroscience
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Anxiety and Depression in Young People (AnDY)
ID Code:66139
Publisher:American Psychological Association

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