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Comment on S´ rednicka-Tober et al.: Higher PUFA and n-3 PUFA, conjugated linoleic acid, α-tocopherol and iron, but lower iodine and selenium concentrations in organic milk: a systematic literature review and meta- and redundancy analyses

Givens, D. I. and Lovegrove, J. A. (2016) Comment on S´ rednicka-Tober et al.: Higher PUFA and n-3 PUFA, conjugated linoleic acid, α-tocopherol and iron, but lower iodine and selenium concentrations in organic milk: a systematic literature review and meta- and redundancy analyses. British Journal of Nutrition, 116 (1). pp. 1-2. ISSN 1475-2662

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1017/S0007114516001604

Abstract/Summary

Comment on S´ rednicka-Tober et al.: Higher PUFA and n-3 PUFA, conjugated linoleic acid, α-tocopherol and iron, but lower iodine and selenium concentrations in organic milk: a systematic literature review and meta- and redundancy analyses Couvreur et al.(6) who showed that increasing grazing from 30 to 100% of the diet led to an increase in milk ALA from 4·0 to 6·1 mg/g total fatty acids (P< 0·001), similar to those reported by S´ rednicka-Tober et al.(1) shown in Table 1 for conventional and organic milk, respectively. Overall, differences in milk fatty acids in organic v. conventional systems are extremely small when examined in the context of total diets and would have very limited contribution to nutrition or health – and the differences are because of the diet of the cow and not specifically because of organic production.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Agriculture, Policy and Development > Food Production and Quality Division > Animal, Dairy and Food Chain Sciences (ADFCS)
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy > Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences > Human Nutrition Research Group
ID Code:66211
Publisher:Cambridge University Press

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