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Math self-concept, grades, and achievement test scores: long-term reciprocal effects across five waves and three achievement tracks

Arens, A. K., Marsh, H., W., Pekrun, R., Lichtenfeld, S., Murayama, K. and vom Hofe, R. (2017) Math self-concept, grades, and achievement test scores: long-term reciprocal effects across five waves and three achievement tracks. Journal of Educational Psychology, 109 (5). pp. 621-634. ISSN 0022-0663

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1037/edu0000163

Abstract/Summary

This study examines reciprocal effects between self-concept and achievement by considering a long time span covering grades 5 through 9. Extending previous research on the reciprocal effects model (REM), this study tests (1) the assumption of developmental equilibrium as time-invariant cross-lagged paths from self-concept to achievement and from achievement to self-concept, (2) the generalizability of reciprocal relations of self-concept when using school grades and standardized achievement test scores as achievement indicators, and (3) the invariance of findings across secondary school achievement tracks. Math self-concept, school grades in math, and math achievement test scores were measured once each school year with a representative sample of 3,425 German students. Students’ gender, IQ, and socioeconomic status (SES) were controlled in all analyses. The findings supported the assumption of developmental equilibrium for reciprocal effects between self-concept and achievement across time. The pattern of results was found to be invariant across students attending different achievement tracks and could be replicated when using school grades and achievement test scores in separate and in combined models. The findings of this study thus underscore the generalizability and robustness of the REM.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Department of Psychology
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Development
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Department of Clinical Language Sciences
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Social
ID Code:66859
Additional Information:Publisher Statement: This article may not exactly replicate the final version published in the APA journal. It is not the copy of record.
Publisher:American Psychological Association

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