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Rapeseed meal hydrolysate as substrate for microbial astaxanthin production

Harith, Z. T., Charalampopoulos, D. and Chatzifragkou, A. (2019) Rapeseed meal hydrolysate as substrate for microbial astaxanthin production. Biochemical Engineering Journal, 151. 107330. ISSN 1369-703X

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1016/j.bej.2019.107330

Abstract/Summary

Rapeseed meal, a by-product of oil processing industry, was evaluated as a substrate for astaxanthin production by the yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous DSMZ 5626. Four commercial enzymes were tested at different concentrations (1–15%, v/v) for their ability to break down the cellulosic and hemicellulosic compounds of rapeseed meal into fermentable sugars. Viscozyme® L and cellulase demonstrated the highest glucose recovery yields (47–52%, w/w for 15% (v/v) of enzyme loading) with 7–11 g/l of net glucose released in the hydrolysates. Pectinase and Accellerase® hydrolysates supported the best cell growth and astaxanthin production in batch shake flask cultures, with maximum biomass of 26 g/l and 15 g/l, respectively, and astaxanthin yields (Y⁠P/X) of 258–332 μg per g of biomass. In batch bioreactor trials, pectinase hydrolysates resulted in high biomass (42 g/l) and astaxanthin production (11 mg/l) aided by the presence of glycerol (originating from the enzyme formulation) which served as additional energy and carbon source. Finally, simple glass beads disruption lead into satisfactory astaxanthin extraction (95%, w/w) in acetone. The findings of this study generate knowledge towards scale-up potential of microbial astaxanthin production using rapeseed meal hydrolysate as fermentation feedstock

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy > Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences > Food Research Group
ID Code:85546
Publisher:Elsevier

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