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A randomised trial to investigate the effects of acute consumption of a blackcurrant juice drink on markers of vascular reactivity and bioavailability of anthocyanins in human subjects

Jin, J., Alimbetov, D., George, T., Gordon, M. H. and Lovegrove, J. A. (2011) A randomised trial to investigate the effects of acute consumption of a blackcurrant juice drink on markers of vascular reactivity and bioavailability of anthocyanins in human subjects. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 65. pp. 849-856. ISSN 0954-3007

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To link to this article DOI: 10.1038/ejcn.2011.55

Abstract/Summary

Objective: To study the bioavailability of anthocyanins and the effects of a 20% blackcurrant juice drink on vascular reactivity, plasma antioxidant status and other CVD risk markers. Subjects/Methods: The study was a randomised, cross over, double blind, placebo controlled acute meal study. Twenty healthy volunteers (11 females 9 males) were recruited, and all subjects completed the study. Fasted volunteers consumed a 20% blackcurrant juice drink (250 ml) or a control drink following a low-flavonoid diet for the previous 72 hours. Vascular reactivity was assessed at baseline and 120 mins after juice consumption by Laser Doppler Imaging (LDI). Plasma and urine samples were collected periodically over an 8 hour period for analysis, with a final urine sample collected at 24h. The cross over was performed after a 4-week washout. Results: There were no significant effects of the 20% blackcurrant juice drink on acute measures of vascular reactivity, biomarkers of endothelial function or lipid risk factors. Consumption of the test juice caused increases in plasma vitamin C (P=0.006), and urinary anthocyanins (P<0.001). Delphinidin-3-rutinoside and cyanidin-3-rutinoside were the main anthocyanins excreted in urine with delphinidin-3-glucoside also detected. The yield of anthocyanins in urine was 0.021 ± 0.003% of the dietary intake of delphinidin glycosides and 0.009 ± 0.002 % of the dietary intake of cyanidin glycosides. Conclusions: The juice consumption did not have a significant effect on vascular reactivity. Anthocyanins were present at low concentrations in the urine, and microbial metabolites of flavonoids were detected in plasma after juice consumption.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy > Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences > Human Nutrition Research Group
Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Institute for Cardiovascular and Metabolic Research (ICMR)
Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Chemical Analysis Facility (CAF)
ID Code:19677
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group

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