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Word position and stress effects in consonant cluster perception and production

Cilibrasi, L., Stojanovik, V. and Riddell, P. (2015) Word position and stress effects in consonant cluster perception and production. Dyslexia, 21 (1). pp. 50-59. ISSN 1099-0909

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1002/dys.1488

Abstract/Summary

The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the saliency effect for word beginnings reported in children with Dyslexia (Marshall & van der Lely, 2009) can be found also in TD children. Thirty-four TD Italian children aged 8-10 completed two specifically designed tasks: a production task and a perception task. Both tasks used nonwords containing clusters consisting of plosive plus liquid (eg. pl). Clusters could be either in a stressed or in an unstressed syllable, and could be either in initial position (first syllable) or in medial position (second syllable). In the production task children were asked to repeat the non-words. In the perception task, the children were asked to discriminate between two nonwords differing in one phoneme belonging to a cluster by reporting whether two repetitions were the same or different. Results from the production task showed that children are more accurate in repeating stressed than unstressed syllables, but there was no difference with respect to position of the cluster. Results from the perception task showed that children performed more accurately when discriminating word initial contrasts than when discriminating word medial contrasts, especially if the cluster was unstressed. Implications of this finding for clinical assessments are discussed.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Centre for Literacy and Multilingualism
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Department of Psychology
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Development
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Department of Clinical Language Sciences
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Language and Cognition
ID Code:38530
Publisher:Wiley

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