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In vitro colonic metabolism of coffee and chlorogenic acid results in selective changes in human faecal microbiota growth

Mills, C. E., Touzonis, X., Oruna-Concha, M.-J., Mottram, D. S., Gibson, G. R. and Spencer, J. P. E. (2015) In vitro colonic metabolism of coffee and chlorogenic acid results in selective changes in human faecal microbiota growth. British Journal of Nutrition, 113 (8). pp. 1220-1227. ISSN 0007-1145

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1017/S0007114514003948

Abstract/Summary

Coffee is a relatively rich source of chlorogenic acids (CGA), which, like other polyphenols are postulated to exert preventative effects against cardiovascular disease and type-2 diabetes. As a considerable proportion of ingested CGA reaches the large intestine, CGA may be capable of exerting beneficial effects in the large gut. Here we utilise a stirred, anaerobic, pH controlled, batch culture fermentation model of the distal region of the colon in order to investigate the impact of coffee and CGA on the growth of the human faecal microbiota. Incubation of the coffee with the human faecal microbiota led to the rapid metabolism of CGA (4h) and the production of dihydrocaffeic acid and dihydroferulic acid, whilst caffeine remained un-metabolised. The coffee with the highest levels of CGA (p<0.05, relative to the other coffees) induced a significant increase in Bifidobacterium spp. relative to the control at 10 hours post exposure (p<0.05). Similarly, an equivalent quantity of CGA (80.8mg; matched with that in high CGA coffee) induced a significant increase in Bifidobacterium spp. (p<0.05). CGA alone also induced a significant increase in the Clostridium coccoides-Eubacterium rectale group (p<0.05). This selective metabolism and subsequent amplification of specific bacterial populations could be beneficial to host health.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy > Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences > Food Microbial Sciences Research Group
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy > Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences > Human Nutrition Research Group
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy > Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences > Food Research Group
ID Code:39182
Publisher:Cambridge University Press

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