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Extractability and characteristics of proteins deriving from wheat DDGS

Chatzifragkou, A., Prabhakumari, P. C., Kosik, O., Lovegrove, A., Shewry, P. R. and Charalampopoulos, D. (2016) Extractability and characteristics of proteins deriving from wheat DDGS. Food Chemistry, 198. pp. 12-19. ISSN 0308-8146

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1016/j.foodchem.2015.11.036

Abstract/Summary

Wheat Distillers’ Dried Grains with Solubles (DDGS) and in-process samples were used for protein extraction. Prolamins were the predominant protein components in the samples. The absence of extractable α- and γ-gliadins in DDGS indicated protein aggregation during the drum drying processing stage. Prolamin extraction was performed using 70% (v/v) ethanol or alkaline-ethanol solution in the presence of reducing agent. DDGS extracts had relatively low protein contents (14-44.9%, w/w), regardless of the condition applied. The wet solids were the most suitable raw material for protein extraction, with recovery yields of ~ 55% (w/w) and protein content of ~58% (w/w) in 70% (v/v) ethanol. Protein extracts from wet solids were significantly rich in glutamic acid and proline. Mass balance calculations demonstrated the high carbohydrate content (~ 50%, w/w) of solid residues. Overall, the feasibility of utilising in-process samples of DDGS for protein extraction with commercial potential was demonstrated.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Chemical Analysis Facility (CAF) > Thermal (CAF)
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Agriculture, Policy and Development > Biodiversity, Crops and Agroecosystems Division > Crops Research Group
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy > Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences > Food Research Group
ID Code:46416
Publisher:Elsevier

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