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Development and characterisation of protein films derived from dried distillers’ grains with solubles and in-process samples

Prabhakumari, P., Chatzifragkou, A., Kosik, O., Lovegrove, A., Shewry, P. R. and Charalampopoulos, D. (2018) Development and characterisation of protein films derived from dried distillers’ grains with solubles and in-process samples. Industrial Crops and Products, 121. pp. 258-266. ISSN 0926-6690

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1016/j.indcrop.2018.05.016

Abstract/Summary

Polymer films were developed utilising proteins extracted from wheat distillers’ dried grains with solubles (DDGS) and in-process samples (wet solids), both by-products of bioethanol production process. Structural characterisation of DDGS and wet solids films indicated a change in the secondary structure of the proteins, reflecting the impact of DDGS production process such as effect of enzyme on protein properties and consequently on the film properties; whereas the developed films exhibited a rough surface with voids. Determination of moisture sensitivity indicated that DDGS films exhibited more hydrophilicity than wet solids films, with the same trend being observed for their water solubility and water uptake. The moisture content and solubility of DDGS films ranged from 10.2-14.2 % and 32.3-41.8 % respectively whereas those for wet solids’ film ranged from 18.9-19.8 % and 23.8-24.2 % respectively. The mechanical properties of DDGS and wet solids (ranging from 0.27-0.32 MPa) were comparatively lower than commercial wheat gluten film (0.6 MPa). The poor mechanical properties and high water vapour permeability of DDGS and the wet solids films limit their application as biodegradable packaging materials. However, based on their hydrophilicity, the developed films have potential applications in agriculture and horticulture as controlled release matrices and soil conditioners.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Chemical Analysis Facility (CAF) > Spectrometry (CAF)
Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Chemical Analysis Facility (CAF) > Thermal (CAF)
Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Chemical Analysis Facility (CAF) > Xray (CAF)
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Agriculture, Policy and Development > Biodiversity, Crops and Agroecosystems Division > Crops Research Group
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy > Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences > Food Research Group
ID Code:77039
Publisher:Elsevier

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