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The effect of probiotics on cognitive function across the human lifespan: a systematic review

Eastwood, J., Walton, G. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5426-5635, Van Hemert, S., Williams, C. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4452-671X and Lamport, D. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4592-0439 (2021) The effect of probiotics on cognitive function across the human lifespan: a systematic review. Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews, 128. pp. 311-327. ISSN 0149-7634

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1016/j.neubiorev.2021.06.032

Abstract/Summary

Recently the scientific community has seen a growing interest in the role of the gut-brain axis and, in particular, how probiotic supplementation may influence neural function and behaviour via manipulation of the gut microbiota. The purpose of this review was to systematically review the current literature exploring the effect of probiotic intervention on cognitive function. PsychINFO, Web of Science, PubMed and Google Scholar were searched for human trials. Studies selected for inclusion administered a probiotic intervention and included at least one behavioural measure of cognitive performance. A total of 30 experimental papers were included, exploring the effect of probiotics across a variety of ages, populations and cognitive domains. The evidence suggests there may be potential for probiotics to enhance cognitive function or attenuate cognitive decline, particularly in clinically relevant adult populations for whom cognitive dysfunction may be present. However, the limited number of studies and the quality of the existing research makes it challenging to interpret the data. Further research is clearly warranted. PROSPERO: CRD42020164820.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Department of Psychology
Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Neuroscience
Life Sciences > School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy > Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences > Food Microbial Sciences Research Group
Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Nutrition and Health
ID Code:99273
Publisher:Elsevier

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