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Factors influencing European consumer uptake of personalised nutrition: results of a qualitative analysis

Stewart-Knox, B., Kuznesof, S., Robinson, J., Rankin, A., Orr, K., Duffy, M., Poínhos, R., Vaz de Almeida, M. D., Macready, A., Gallagher, C., Berezowska, A., Fischer, A. R.H., Navas-Carretero, S., Riemer, M., Traczyk, I., Gjelstad, I. M.F., Mavrogianni, C. and Frewer, L. J. (2013) Factors influencing European consumer uptake of personalised nutrition: results of a qualitative analysis. Appetite, 66. pp. 67-74. ISSN 0195-6663

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1016/j.appet.2013.03.001

Abstract/Summary

The aim of this research was to explore consumer perceptions of personalised nutrition and to compare these across three different levels of ‘‘medicalization’’: lifestyle assessment (no blood sampling); phenotypic assessment (blood sampling); genomic assessment (blood and buccal sampling). The protocol was developed from two pilot focus groups conducted in the UK. Two focus groups (one comprising only ‘‘older’’ individuals between 30 and 60 years old, the other of adults 18–65 yrs of age) were run in the UK, Spain, the Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Ireland, Greece and Germany (N = 16). The analysis (guided using grounded theory) suggested that personalised nutrition was perceived in terms of benefit to health and fitness and that convenience was an important driver of uptake. Negative attitudes were associated with internet delivery but not with personalised nutrition per se. Barriers to uptake were linked to broader technological issues associated with data protection, trust in regulator and service providers. Services that required a fee were expected to be of better quality and more secure. An efficacious, transparent and trustworthy regulatory framework for personalised nutrition is required to alleviate consumer concern. In addition, developing trust in service providers is important if such services to be successful.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Food Chain and Health
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Department of Psychology
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Agriculture, Policy and Development > Economic and Social Sciences Division > Food Economics and Marketing (FEM)
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy > Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences > Human Nutrition Research Group
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Nutrition and Health
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Social
ID Code:40575
Uncontrolled Keywords:Personalised nutrition; Nutrigenomics; Consumer; Qualitative; Barriers; Acceptance; Focus group; Food4Me
Publisher:Elsevier

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