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Association between diet-quality scores, adiposity, total cholesterol and markers of nutritional status in European adults: findings from the Food4Me study

Fallaize, R., Livingstone, K. M., Celis-Morales, C., Macready, A. L., San-Cristobal, R., Navas-Carretero, S., Marsaux, C. F. M., O’Donovan, C. B., Kolossa, S., Moschonis, G., Walsh, M. C., Gibney, E. R., Brennan, L., Bouwman, J., Manios, Y., Jarosz, M., Martinez, J. A., Daniel, H., Saris, W. H. M., Gundersen, T. E. , Drevon, C. A., Gibney, M. J., Mathers, J. C. and Lovegrove, J. A. (2018) Association between diet-quality scores, adiposity, total cholesterol and markers of nutritional status in European adults: findings from the Food4Me study. Nutrients, 10 (1). pp. 49-64. ISSN 2072-6643

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To link to this item DOI: 10.3390/nu10010049

Abstract/Summary

Diet-quality scores (DQS), which are developed across the globe, are used to define adherence to specific eating patterns and have been associated with risk of coronary heart disease and type-II diabetes. We explored the association between five diet-quality scores (Healthy Eating Index,HEI; Alternate Healthy Eating Index, AHEI; MedDietScore, MDS; PREDIMED Mediterranean DietScore, P-MDS; Dutch Healthy Diet-Index, DHDI) and markers of metabolic health (anthropometry,objective physical activity levels (PAL), and dried blood spot total cholesterol (TC), total carotenoids,and omega-3 index) in the Food4Me cohort, using regression analysis. Dietary intake was assessed using a validated Food Frequency Questionnaire. Participants (n= 1480) were adults recruited from seven European Union (EU) countries. Overall, women had higher HEI and AHEI than men (p< 0.05), and scores varied significantly between countries. For all DQS, higher scores were associated with lower body mass index, lower waist-to-height ratio and waist circumference, and higher total carotenoids and omega-3-index (p trends < 0.05). Higher HEI, AHEI, DHDI, and P-MDS scores were associated with increased daily PAL, moderate and vigorous activity, and reduced sedentary behaviour (p trend < 0.05). We observed no association between DQS and TC. To conclude,higher DQS, which reflect better dietary patterns, were associated with markers of better nutritional status and metabolic health.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Food Chain and Health
Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Centre for Integrative Neuroscience and Neurodynamics (CINN)
Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Institute for Cardiovascular and Metabolic Research (ICMR)
Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Institute for Food, Nutrition and Health (IFNH)
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Department of Psychology
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Agriculture, Policy and Development > Economic and Social Sciences Division > Food Economics and Marketing (FEM)
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy > Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences > Human Nutrition Research Group
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Nutrition and Health
ID Code:74892
Uncontrolled Keywords:diet scores; metabolic health; personalized nutrition; Healthy Eating Index; Mediterranean Diet Score; Dutch Healthy Diet Index; nutritional biomarkers; dried blood spots
Publisher:MDPI

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