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Personalised nutrition advice reduces intake of discretionary foods and beverages: findings from the Food4Me randomised controlled trial

Livingstone, K. M., Celis-Morales, C., Navas-Carretero, S., San-Cristobal, R., Forster, H., Woolhead, C., O’Donovan, C. B., Moschonis, G., Manios, Y., Traczyk, I., Gundersen, T. E., Drevon, C. A., Marsaux, C. F. M., Fallaize, R., Macready, A. L. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0368-9336, Daniel, H., Saris, W. H. M., Lovegrove, J. A., Gibney, M., Gibney, E. R. , Walsh, M., Brennan, L., Martinez, J. A. and Mathers, J. C. (2021) Personalised nutrition advice reduces intake of discretionary foods and beverages: findings from the Food4Me randomised controlled trial. International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 18 (1). 70. ISSN 1479-5868

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1186/s12966-021-01136-5

Abstract/Summary

Background: The effect of personalised nutrition advice on discretionary foods intake is unknown. To date, two national classifications for discretionary foods have been derived. This study examined changes in intake of discretionary foods and beverages following a personalised nutrition intervention using these two classifications. Methods: Participants were recruited into a 6-month RCT across seven European countries (Food4Me) and were randomised to receive generalised dietary advice (control) or one of three levels of personalised nutrition advice (based on diet [L1], phenotype [L2] and genotype [L3]). Dietary intake was derived from an FFQ. An analysis of covariance was used to determine intervention effects at month 6 between personalised nutrition (overall and by levels) and control on i) percentage energy from discretionary items and ii) percentage contribution of total fat, SFA, total sugars and salt to discretionary intake, defined by Food Standards Scotland (FSS) and Australian Dietary Guidelines (ADG) classifications. Results: Of the 1607 adults at baseline, n=1270 (57% female) completed the intervention. Percentage sugars from FSS discretionary items was lower in personalised nutrition vs control (19.0 ± 0.37 vs 21.1 ± 0.65; P=0.005). Percentage energy (31.2 ± 0.59 vs 32.7 ± 0.59; P=0.031), percentage total fat (31.5 ± 0.37 vs 33.3 ± 0.65; P=0.021), SFA (36.0 ± 0.43 vs 37.8 ± 0.75; P=0.034) and sugars (31.7 ± 0.44 vs 34.7 ± 0.78; P<0.001) from ADG discretionary items were lower in personalised nutrition vs control. There were greater reductions in ADG percentage energy and percentage total fat, SFA and salt for those randomised to L3 vs L2. Conclusions: Compared with generalised dietary advice, personalised nutrition advice achieved greater reductions in discretionary foods intake when the classification included all foods high in fat, added sugars and salt. Future personalised nutrition approaches may be used to target intakes of discretionary foods.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Food Chain and Health
Interdisciplinary Research Centres (IDRCs) > Centre for Integrative Neuroscience and Neurodynamics (CINN)
Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Institute for Cardiovascular and Metabolic Research (ICMR)
Interdisciplinary Research Centres (IDRCs) > Institute for Food, Nutrition and Health (IFNH)
Life Sciences > School of Agriculture, Policy and Development > Economic and Social Sciences Division > Food Economics and Marketing (FEM)
Life Sciences > School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy > Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences > Human Nutrition Research Group
Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Nutrition and Health
ID Code:98636
Uncontrolled Keywords:Discretionary; discretionary foods and beverages; personalised nutrition; internet-based; intervention; European; adults, Food4Me
Publisher:The International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity

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