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Impact of a food-based dietary fat exchange model for replacing dietary saturated with unsaturated fatty acids in healthy men on plasma phospholipids fatty acid profiles and dietary patterns

Sellem, L., Antoni, R., Koutsos, A., Ozen, E., Wong, G., Ayyad, H., Weech, M., Schulze, M. B., Wernitz, A., Fielding, B. A., Robertson, D., Jackson, K. G. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0070-3203, Griffin, B. A. and Lovegrove, J. A. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7633-9455 (2022) Impact of a food-based dietary fat exchange model for replacing dietary saturated with unsaturated fatty acids in healthy men on plasma phospholipids fatty acid profiles and dietary patterns. European Journal of Nutrition. ISSN 1436-6215

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1007/s00394-022-02910-2

Abstract/Summary

Purpose: UK guidelines recommend dietary saturated fatty acids (SFAs) should not exceed 10% total energy (%TE) for cardiovascular disease prevention, with benefits observed when SFAs are replaced with unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs). This study aimed to assess the efficacy of a dietary exchange model using commercially available foods to replace SFAs with UFAs. Methods: Healthy men (n=109, age 48, SD 11y) recruited to the Reading, Imperial, Surrey, Saturated fat Cholesterol Intervention-1 (RISSCI-1) study (ClinicalTrials.Gov n°NCT03270527) followed two sequential 4-week isoenergetic moderate-fat (34%TE) diets: high-SFA (18%TE SFAs, 16%TE UFAs) and low-SFA (10%TE SFAs, 24%TE UFAs). Dietary intakes were assessed using 4-day weighed diet diaries. Nutrient intakes were analysed using paired t-tests, fasting plasma phospholipid fatty acid (PL-FA) profiles and dietary patterns were analysed using orthogonal partial least square discriminant analyses. Results: Participants exchanged 10.2%TE (SD 4.1) SFAs for 9.7%TE (SD 3.9) UFAs between the high and low-SFA diets, reaching target intakes with minimal effect on other nutrients or energy intakes. Analyses of dietary patterns confirmed successful incorporation of recommended foods from commercially available sources (e.g. dairy products, snacks, oils, and fats), without affecting participants’ overall dietary intakes. Analyses of plasma PL-FAs indicated good compliance to the dietary intervention and foods of varying SFA content. Conclusions: RISSCI-1 dietary exchange model successfully replaced dietary SFAs with UFAs in free-living healthy men using commercially available foods, and without altering their dietary patterns. Further intervention studies are required to confirm utility and feasibility of such food-based dietary fat replacement models at a population level.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Institute for Cardiovascular and Metabolic Research (ICMR)
Life Sciences > School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy > Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences > Human Nutrition Research Group
ID Code:105127
Publisher:Springer

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